Capture your clients in a Positive Light, with dignity and authenticity.


Positive Light offers family portrait sessions to capture the loving moments of the individuals and families served by non-profit organizations in the Greater Washington DC region.


Using lifestyle and documentary photography, Positive Light helps non-profits move away from pity-based storytelling, toward respectful human-connection story-telling.

Positive Light aims to change community perceptions about the underserved, and helps to highlight the important work of human service non-profit organizations.

A Positive Light example: view 'Ethan's Mom'

Every family should have the opportunity to document their story.


About

In 2018, while working as Development Director at Aspire Counseling, I offered to photograph some of the the families served by Aspire -- a mental health non-profit organization providing mental health therapy to uninsured and lower-income individuals and families. During each photo shoot many of the mothers would cry. When I asked why, the answer was the same, they had never posed for photographs with their children. They had never had a family portrait taken. The mothers were crying tears of joy and gratitude. I was shocked and humbled, and asked the question -- why is lifestyle family photography so exclusive? How can it be more accessible? This led me to create ‘Positive Light’ - a photography service for less fortunate families in our region.

Services

With an Artists & Scholars Project Grants (ASPG) from the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, I am able to offer Lifestyle or Documentary Style Family Photo Sessions at no-charge.

Families receive a password protected online gallery and a canvas image for their home.

Non-profits, with client permission, can use the images to highlight the impact of their work, and the beauty and strength of the individuals they serve.


“Positive Light photography will emphasize your clients' strength, joy and courage.”

“Fleur Louise Photography Positive Light Project is supported in part by funding from the Montgomery County Government and the Arts & Humanities Council of Montgomery County.”